About Us

Local 443 is affiliated with Council 28 of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME), and the Washington State Labor Council (WSLC). Chartered by the American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO) in 1942, Local 443 represents the interests of thousands of state employees in Thurston and Mason counties in the state of Washington.

Our general membership meetings are held at the Davis-Williams Bldg. (WSLC Bldg.) suite 205, at 906 Columbia St. Olympia, WA at 6:00 p.m. on the 3rd Tuesday of every month unless otherwise noted. Light refreshments are provided. If you would like to request childcare or accommodation, please contact Local 443.

The Local Executive Board meets on the first Tuesday of every month. See our Events Calendar for more info.

Local 443 is governed by the constitution and by-laws of Local 443, Council 28 and AFSCME constitutions.

 

Mission

The mission of Local 443 is to provide a forum for Local 443 members to discuss, debate, organize and promote the objectives of the AFSCME International which include:


Organizing Activities

To promote organizationing activities in bargaining units, agencies and offices of the Local 443 members


Collective Bargaining

To promote the welfare of the membership and to provide a voice in the determination of the terms and conditions of employment. We are committed to the process of collective bargaining as the most desirable, democratic, and effective method to achieve this. Both as union members and as citizens, we shall also employ available legislative and political action.

AFSCME is committed to helping you get the student debt relief you deserve.

We won because we showed decisions-makers and the public that our fight is not just for our jobs and families, but for our communities as well.
L&I interpreters overcame divisions that the Freedom Foundation tried to exploit and chose to unionize for their profession and the patients they serve.
As a fish hatchery specialist with the Department of Fish and Wildlife in 1998, Kurt Spiegel was lucky. He had a good state job, and even better he had a great coworker—a friend to learn the ropes with as they navigated state service.
WFSE members ran a successful petition that ended years of inaction from the state on the issue of housing foster children in hotel rooms.

In keeping with the resolution passed by the Washington Federation of State Employees (WFSE) Natural Resources Policy Committee earlier this year and the letter sent by WFSE to the Board of Natural Resources and the Commissioner of Public Lands, the following statement is in response to Superintendent of Public Instruction Chris Reykdal's proposal to cea

The COVID-19 pandemic arrived at a time when our nation’s health care workers were already experiencing burnout. The National Academy of Medicine, in a report from 2019, said that 35% to 54% of nurses and physicians in the United States had “substantial symptoms of burnout.”

Then things got worse.

CJ Alicandro (left) is pictured with a few of their colleagues. Photo credit: AFSCME Council 75.

CJ Alicandro (left) is pictured with a few of their colleagues. Photo credit: AFSCME Council 75.

Thanks to engaged WFSE members and a robust union contract, we don’t have non-merit staff providing unemployment insurance or employment services within our state. We don’t contract out.