About Us

Local 443 is affiliated with Council 28 of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME), and the Washington State Labor Council (WSLC). Chartered by the American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO) in 1942, Local 443 represents the interests of thousands of state employees in Thurston and Mason counties in the state of Washington.

Our general membership meetings are held at the Davis-Williams Bldg. (WSLC Bldg.) suite 205, at 906 Columbia St. Olympia, WA at 6:00 p.m. on the 3rd Tuesday of every month unless otherwise noted. Light refreshments are provided. If you would like to request childcare or accommodation, please contact Local 443.

The Local Executive Board meets on the first Tuesday of every month. See our Events Calendar for more info.

Local 443 is governed by the constitution and by-laws of Local 443, Council 28 and AFSCME constitutions.

 

Mission

The mission of Local 443 is to provide a forum for Local 443 members to discuss, debate, organize and promote the objectives of the AFSCME International which include:


Organizing Activities

To promote organizationing activities in bargaining units, agencies and offices of the Local 443 members


Collective Bargaining

To promote the welfare of the membership and to provide a voice in the determination of the terms and conditions of employment. We are committed to the process of collective bargaining as the most desirable, democratic, and effective method to achieve this. Both as union members and as citizens, we shall also employ available legislative and political action.

The Early Learning Center on the Everett Community College campus is in danger of being handed over to an outside contractor that will operate it as a limited-service daycare center. Our community of educators, workers, parents, and community have been left out of the process.

AFSCME President Lee Saunders on Monday joined President Joe Biden and members of his administration, as well as a bipartisan group of lawmakers, for 

The House of Representatives has passed President Joe Biden’s transformational bipartisan infrastructure plan, which Biden will soon sign into law. The passage earned praise from AFSCME President Lee Saunders, who, in a statement, said, “We are turning a corner.”

As solidarity actions and strikes sweep the nation, workers are making history by organizing their workplaces for the first time.

When workers belong to a union, they have a unified voice to create safer, stronger and healthier workplaces. Organizing is our most effective tool to determine workplace dignity, hours, working conditions and quality of life. Workers aren’t stuck with dangerous workplace conditions with poor wages and benefits. They can improve them, together.

Are you a member interested in sharpening your organizing skills? WFSE is recruiting members to participate in a statewide outreach campaign to educate non-members on the value of union membership.

If you're interested, you'll need to commit to a 10-day stint. You'll receive hands-on, full time experience as an organizer-in-training while building our union.

The Public Service Freedom to Negotiate Act was introduced today in the House of Representatives by Rep. Matt Cartwright (D-Pa.). The bill, which currently has 144 cosponsors, would set a minimum nationwide standard of collective bargaining rights that states must provide. It would empower workers to join together for a voice on the job not only to improve working conditions but to improve the communities in which they work.

We’ve said it before: Life is better in a union

Workers who belong to unions make more money than their nonunion counterparts. They have better health care insurance and retirement plans, more job security and safer working conditions. They’re happier.

Some of the nation’s largest cultural institutions accepted more than $1.6 billion in federal help to weather the coronavirus pandemic, but continued to let go of workers – even though the assistance was meant to shore up payrolls and keep workers on the job, according to a report released by AFSCME Cultural Workers United.

When Fran Krugen’s late husband was first diagnosed with diabetes, his insulin cost about $35 a bottle.

But Krugen, an AFSCME retiree from Arizona, will never forget the day when she and her husband went to the drug store to pick up his insulin and the pharmacist told them it now cost $900 a bottle.

“This was medication he needed to live, and we had insurance,” she said at a press briefing earlier this month. “We looked at each other and had to ask ourselves: Do we make the house payment? Do we buy food? Or do we pay for his medication?”